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Full text of "The railway for Grey, facts for the ratepayers concerning the Toronto, Grey & Bruce railw'y"



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The Railway for Grey. 



FACTS FOE THE RATEPAYERS 



CONCERNING THE 



Toronto, Grey & Bruce Railw'y 



Stockholders of the Toronto, Grey <& Brace Railway. 

The following is a list of the stockholders of the Toronto, Grey and 
Bruce Railway Company on the 31sfc of July, 1869, when the Company 
was organized, and now amounting in all to $325,000, of which one-half 
has already been paid up and expended on the road. Let the Welling- 
ton, Grey and Bruce Railway Company produce their stock list ! They 
dare not ; as the sum of it only amounts to $30,000, and as most of the 
signatures are bogus : — 



SUBSCRIBERS NAMES. SHARES. 


AM T. 


SUBSCRIBERS NAMES. SHARES. 


AMT. 


Gordon Mackay& Co 

A. It. McMaster& Brother 

John Shedden 


100 

100 

100 

100 

100 

100 

100 

50 

50 

50 

50 

5 ) 

50 

50 

£W) 

50 

50 


$10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 


J. G. Worts 

T. C.Chisholm (in trust) 
John Shedden 


50 

50 

50 

50 

50 

50 

40 

40 

30 

25 

25 

25 

25 

20' 

20 

20 

20 • 

20 


$5,000 
5,000 
5,000 


H. S. Howland 


John Shedden (in trust) 
John Gordon (in trust) .. 
John Gordon (in trust)... 

Lyman & McNab 

John Ginty 

Dickey, Neil & Co 


5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
• 4,000 
4,000 
3,000 
2,500 
2,500 
2,500 
2,500 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 


Gooderhain & Worts 

Robert Walker & Sons ... 
E. H. King, Montreal. . 

Geo. Brown 

Noah Barnliart 


Bryce, McMurrich oc (Jo... 

Thomas Lailey 

Thomson k Barns 

Alexander Manning 

Pice Lewis & Son 

John McDonald & Co.. .. 
Thomas Dick 


Robertson k Cook 

John Gordon ... 

Win. Elliot .. 

Lyman, Llliot & Co .... 
Blaikie & Alexander .... 

W. B. Hamilton 

W. P. Howland 

John Boyd & Go.' 

W. &R. Griffith 


Sir Chas. Fox & Sons, 

London 






SUBSCRIBERS \ AMKs. 



SHARKS. AM T. 



Win. II. Howland 20 $2,000 

Henderson fcBostwick ... 20 2,000 

A. W. Lauder 20 2,000 

W. II. Beatty 20 2,000 

S. A. Oliver 20 2,000 

John Taylor & Bros 20 2,000 

R. (J. Dallas 20 2,000 

\V. c. Chewett & Co.... 20 2,000 

B. H. Dixon 20 2,000 

John J. Vickers 20 2,000 

Duusnaugh & Watson ... 20 2,000 

Booth & Son 20 2,000 

J. k J. Taylor 20 2,000 

David Buehan 20 2,000 

E. Leadlay 20 2,000 

Frank Smith k Co 20 2,000 

M. Staunton 20 2,000 

J. Shields 12 1,200 

H. E. M. Boulton, by W. 

H. Boulton.'. 10 1,000 

James E. Smith 10 1,000 

Thos/ Griffith k Co 10 1,000 

P. k F. A. Howland 10 1,000 

•J.Morrison TO 1,000 

Jacques & Hay 10 1,000 

John Kay.. 10 1,000 

O'Keefe & Co 10 1,000 

James Young 10 1,000 

James Michie 10 1,000 

Brown Brothers' 10 1,000 

R. A Hoskins 10 1,000 

Parson Brothers 10 1,000 

John B, Smith 10 1,000 

Jos. Simpson 10 1,000 

Robert H. Gray 10 1,000 

Aldwell k Co..' 10 1,000 

Robert H. Gray 10 1,000 

Joseph Robinson 10 1,000 

G. McGaw 10 1,000 

E. M. Chadwlck 10 1,000 

Wm. Ramsay & Co 10 1,000 

W. J*. Matthews & Co... 10 1,000 

Joseph Leslie 10 1,000 

J.R.Armstrong 10 . 1,000 

Wm. Burke 10 1,000 

NeilCurrie 10 1,000 

W. Jeffrey 10 1,000 

*John .\i. McKay 10 1,000 

P. Burns 10 1,000 

J. Gardhouse 10 1,000 

Campbell & Cassels 10 1,000 

P. Paterson & Son 10 1,000 

Wm. Galbraith 10 1,000 

C. F,. Jones 10 1,000 

B. H. Dixon 10 1,000 

George Barker 10 1,000 

Geo." Stephen, Montreal.. 10 1,000 

Benj. Lvman, Montreal.. 10 1,000 

Geo! Laidlaw 10 1,000 

W. 11. liovutou 10 1,000 



SUBSCRIBERS NAMES. SHARES. AMY. 

Noah Barnhart, in trust 10 $1,000 

John Rankin, Montreal... 10 1,000 

Thomas Lailey 10 * 1,000> 

Ed. Havelman, Brantford 10 1,000 

Adam, Stevenson & Co... ]() 1,000 

Hugh Allan, Montreal... 10 1,000 

James Morrison 7 700* 

John Robertson, Son & Co 5* 500 

Jenning k Brandon 5 500 

John Fiskin 5 500' 

James Shields 5 500 

Gardner k Ramsay 5 500 

Morrison, Taylor & Co .. 5 500 

J as. B. Sorley (intrust)... 5 500 

C J. Campbell 5 500 

J. G. Joseph & Co 5 500 

E. H Graham 5 500 

"VV. Arthurs 5 . 500 

John Canavan 5 500 

C. T. Hurrell 5 500 

Wm. Pyper 5 500 

Hugh Miller 5 500 

John McCarter 5 500 

H. W. Cuff 5 500 

Larratt W. Smith 5 500 

Hughes Brothers 5 500 

James Paterson 5 500 

Osier & Moss 5 500 

If. Eoyd Hime 5 50O 

George Harding . 5 500 

A. S. Irving 5 500 

Thomas Hodgins 5 500 

Arthur Leppar 5 500 

Neil Currie..'. 5 500 

W. A. Murray 5 500 

Walters. Lee 5 50O 

J. Saurin MeMurray 5 500 

Edward Hardman 5 500 

G. Hague 5 500 

E. O. Bickford 5 500 

Thos Thompson 5 500 

Maitland McCarthy 5 500 

J. E. Boyd, St. Jolm,N.B 5 500 

John Riddel 5 500 

C. Perry, in trust 5 500 

J. S. Keith 5 500 

Hurd, Leigh & Co 5 500 

Cubit Spankhall 5 500 

H. Hewitt & Co 5 500 

John Green, Orangeville. 5 500 

J. Stock 4 400 

W. W. Colwell 4 400 

Douglas Laidlaw 4 400 

Noah L. Piper 3 300 

W. Cayley 3 « 300 

Edward Morphy 3 300 

McKenzie & Scott 3 30O 

James Cox 3 300 

A. T. McCord 3 300 

Joseph Davids 3 300 



p> 



SUBSCRIBERS NAMES. SHARE 

Thomas Best 3 

L. Wilson 3 

T. Swinarton 3 

Livingston, Johnson k Co 3 
G. B. McLellan, by W. 

H. Boulton 2 

Jolin Nasinith 2 

Sydney Hamilton 2 

DavidsoTi, McVittie & Co. 2 

D. Galbraith k Co 2 

Robert Jaifray 2 

Pellattfc Osier 2 

J. D. Edgar... 2 

James Fleming 2 

James Thorbn rn v . .. 2 

M. A. Thomas •:.... 2 

S. M. Jarvis 2 

Chandler & Piatt 2 

Sam. Montgomery 2 

W. B. Phipps 2 

T. G. Mason 2 

Alf. J. Mason 2 

J. H. Mason 2 

John Boulton 2 

S. Evans 2 

W. T. Sterne 2 

L. E. Boulton 2 

David Bee 2 

George Gibson 2' 

W. T. Mason 2 

Villiers «fe McCord 2 

N. Johnson 2 

Ford c"c Forbes 2 

R. W*. Laird 2 

J. H. Ince 2 

Columbus H. Green 2 

Mrs. S. Kennedy 2 

Philip Chamber 2 

T. H. Ince 

David W. Smith 

Alex. Gemmel 

Joseph Gearing 

Robert Davis 

M. Morrison 

Blake, Kerr & Wells 

J. Garvin 

J. Proudfoot.... 

H. J. Morse & Co 

Jas. Bain 

E. Harris 

W. S. Durie 

0. J. Whitehead 

Toronto Tea Company. .. 

J. C. Shapter 

P. M. Clark 

M. Shears 

S. He ward 

J. H. Morris 

F. H. Stavnei 



AM T. SUBSCRIBERS NAMES. SHARE. 1 



300 
300 
300 
300 

200 
200 
200 
200 
200 
200 
200 
200 
200 
200 
200 
200 
200 
200 
200 
200 
200 
200 
200 
200 
200 
200 
200 
200 
200 
200 
200 
200 
200 
200 
200 
200 
200 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 



AM T. 



Steward Wells 

George Verral .. 

W. W. Cohvell 

W. Biekford 

R. Hall& Co 

R. Robinson 

F. Pearson 

L. H. Moffatt 

G. M. Yarker 

Bronsden k Patton.... 

G. W. Warner 

W. B. Searth 

G. Duggan./. 

W. Paterson 

JohnCayley 

F. Cay ley 

R. B. Butland 

W. Bayley 

R. Reynolds 

Wingtield k Thomas . 

A. Hamilton 

J. Jackson 

A. W. Morrill 

D. E. Boulton 

H. E. Boulton 

R. Godbold 

Elizabeth God! .old.... 

John Ritchie 

Thomas Wylie 

Justus Lemon 

J. Knight Riddel 

Charles Robinson. .. 

Nathan Clark 

Duncan Cameron.. . . 

Pat. Murphy 

Edward Ward 

Alex. Lewis 

Jackson Potter 

Thomas Harrison 

James Bell 

Adam Hunter 

Alex. Ferguson 

Thomas Sanderson... 

Win. Hunter 

Donald Lamont 

Alex. McLaren 

Win. Clark 

Win. Stone 

John Willoughby.... 

James Harrison 

Walter McLellan 

R. H. Oates 

James Cameron 

Edgar J. Jarvis 

Wadsworth & Unwin. 

W. Dever 

Robt. Jordan k Co... 
W. J. Simcoe Kerr.. 



i Straight forward Statement, 



■«. 



Read the following address which was delivered by the President 

of the Toronto, Grey &> Bruce Railway, John Gordon, Esq., to the 

County Council of Grey, at Owen Sound, on the 9th day of March, 1871, 

as reported in the Owen Sound papers. He undertakes to build the 

road he represents, from both ends simultaneously, in eighteen months. 

Mr. Turner, one cf the Directors of the Wellington, Grey & Bruce 

Kail way, told the council that if his company was forced to do the same* 

that " the county might keep their bonus and be d d." If really 

in earnest about building their road, why should the Wellington, Grey 

& Bruce Railway Company object to work from both ends at once 1 

Why 1 Because they never intend to go beyond Durham ! That is 

their little game ! They to stop at Durham and Cumberland with his 

North Grey Bantling to stick at Meaford. 

Mr Gordon, in addressing the County Council to show the ability of his Com- 
pany to build the extension to Owen Sound, would briefly advert — 1st, to the 
financial position of the Company; 2nd, to what the Toronto, Grey & Rruce Railway, 
a narrow gauge, had done. The bona fide capital already subscribed was $325,000 ; 
of this sum there was paid up enough with the bonuses from the municipalities and 
bonds for $6,000 per mile "they had sold" to finish the line to Mount Forest. That 
line extended from Toronto 90 miles. The rails were now laid to the summit of the 
Caledon Hills, and would be laid to Orangeville the first week of April, to Arthur Vil- 
lage in July,[and to t Mount Forest the first of October/ Work was going on along the 
entire distance of this 90 miles simultaneously, and Mr. Shanly, the Contractor, was 
to i receive a Bonus of one thousand dollars per week for eacli week that he 
would be in advance of his contract — or say, if he'finishes toj'Mount Forest first of 
September, he receives $4,000 {extra. Rolling Stock for that section was provided 
for as follows. Three Locomotives now on the line employed in wrok of construction, 
four more to be delivered in May ; eight passenger cars to be delivered in May ; fifty 
box cars delivered ; fifty box cars constructing ; fifty flat cars delivered ; fifty flat 
cars constructing. The Contract was let in November, 1869, from Toronto to Arthur, 
and the Company would have 90 miles of Railway finished, fully equipped and ready 
foi traffic, with Station houses and grain warehouses, all done with their own means 
and the assistance of the municipalities who so generously confided in the men at the 
head of the Company ; and in the scheme they advocated, all this was achieved with- 
out any foreign aid. The Company was determined to have an independent line, 
free from either English or Yankee control. They were also determined not to mort- 
gage the road for $12,000 per mile as proposed by a rival Company, as such a mort- 
gage (admitting that the road would ever be built) would so encumber and hamper 
the traffic, and cause such dear freights, that such a monopoly would be a 
curse to the County of Grey, instead of a benefit. He could refer them 
to an able report of one of Hamilton's best merchants as to the grasping 
monopoly of the Great Western Railroad and the want of competition experienced by 
Hamilton. The Preston Berlin Railroad, controlled at one time by the Great West- 
ern Railroad Company, was abandoned, and the iron, &c, sold to the Grand Trunk. 

He would now come to the important question before the Council, the extension 
to Owen Sound, which would be about 70 miles long, and how he proposed to build 
it. The Company would undertake to build this section in 18 months, and in 
order to render full justice to the County of Grey, they proposed to begin at both 
ends of the line at once, and to continue the work simultaneously until finished, and 
to give ample security to the corporation of Grey to carry out their 
obligations in every particular. He held that no security or bonds from 
any Company, "however wealthy," were equal to this — namely, building 



the Ime[ from l;oth ends — and nothing short of this should satisfy the guardians 
of the County. The County of Grey was some fifty miles across, and say 
that twenty milts of the road was built and then work stopped, the Company could 
not he compelled to go on, and the north part of the County would have to pay for 
the twenty miles and still he without a road. The resources of the Toronto, Grey 
& Bruce Company to build then : Stock liable- to call at any time, $lo0,00Q ; Bonus 
from Grey and Owen Sound, $300,000 ; Bonds, §450,000 ; Government aid he be- 
lieved would be given to the amount of $149,000 ; Making a total of $1,050,000. - 
He did not pretend to be in the confidence of the Government, but he believed if any 
line would be assisted in Grey it would be the Central, as it was the most direct line, 
and served a tract of country now without any railroad facilities. A word now as to 
the benefits to North Grey, and the saving in time and rates. It brought them 31 
miles nearer lake Ontario than its rival ; it brought them within 8 miles as near the 
Suspension Bridge, by Toronto and Hamilton, as the Wellington, Grey k Bruce 
did ; and by water at Toronto, 30 miles nearer the States ; and if Owen Sound and 
North Crey was ever to participate in the trade of the great West, it was by the short 
and direct cut to lake Ontario, as freights, rates and time (would be proportionably 
less. / 

He would now close by referring to the claims of the Toronto, Grey and Bruce 
Railroad on the Council and people of Grey — 1st, they were of a material kind, 
beingjjy all the odds line to serve Grey best ; 2nd, the Toronto, Grey and Bruce 
Railroad laid claim to their generosity, as had it not been for the projectors of those 
lines, of which Geo. Laidlaw was the great chief, Grey would not have two or three 
railroad companies wooing its trade, lis referred to George Laidlaw mere particularly, 
as much was said in the last campaign in Grey about unjust and wicked legislation 
in connection with the Toronto, Grey and Bruce Charters ; and now the first thing 
by the Wellington Grey and Bruce, or Hamilton City was to ccpy this very grouping 
clause, and by leaving out Egeimont, which is as much benefitted as any of the 
townships, forces the unwilling townships in. The Toronto, Grey and Bruce could 
have played the same, game last time, carried their scheme by leaving certain town- 
ships out, but declined, as such would be unjust ; 3rd, he believed the Toronto, Grey 
and Bruce had claims on their patriotism. They were determined to build lines to 
serve their own country, and develop the resources of this part of the Dominion — 
this grand Canada of ours — lines owned, worked and controlled by Canadians, and 
not a branch of another road, whose chief recommendation was to cairy every fat 
steer to the States, as if the Yankees were the only people who could appreciate good 
beef. 



Wliat your own Reeves say. 

The following is the petition to ths county council of the Ileeves & 
Deputy Reeves for the introduction of the By-Law in aid of the Toronto, 
Grey & Bruce Railway. Read it and say, ratepayers of Grey, if there 
is any humbug in it : — 

TO THE WARDEN AND COUNCIL OF THE COUNTY OF GREY. 

The Petition of the undersigned Reeves and Peputy Beeves of the following Town- 
ships : _HUGH REED, Reeve or Sydenham ; JAMES GARDNER, Deputy 
Reeve of Sydenham ; DR. McGREGOB, Reeve of Holland ; R. J. DOYLE, 
Reeve of Sarawak ; WILLIAM LECX1E, Reeve of Aiitemesia ; B. GHENT, 
Deputy Reeve of Aiitemesia; ROBERT MoGHEE, Reeve of Melancthox ; 
JOHN CAMERON, Deputy Reeve of Holland ; THOMAS PETTMAN, Reeve 
of Keppel ; JAMES BEATTIE, Reeve of Sullivan ; D. McGILlVRAY, Deputy 
Reeve of Sullivan ; ROBERT LINN, Reeve of Derby. 

Sheweth that the Toronto, Grey and Bruce Railway Company having requested 
the following Townships — Melancthon, Proton, Glenelg, O.spivy, Aftemesia, Holland, 
Sullivan, Sydenham, Derby, Keppel, and Sarawak, being a portion of the County 
Municipality of the County of Grey, to grant them a bonus of two hundred and 
sixty-four thousand dollars. 



<) 

We, tiu Baid Petitioners, in conformity with chapter forty-one, thirty-three Vic 
toria, Ontario, desire to aid, to the extent aforesaid, in the construction of the said 
Railway and to be assessed therefor. 

We, therefore, pray 1 hat. your Council shall pass a by-law, and submit the same 
to the vote of the qualified ratepayers of that portion of the Municipality of the 
County of Grey aforesaid', for the purpose of raising the said sum on that portion of 
the County of Grey above set forth, by the issue of debentures of the said Municioal- 
ity of the County of Grey for the amount of said bonus, payable in twenty years, and 
l'or the delivery of the same to the Trustees appointed, or to be appointed, under the 
Act of Incorporation <>i' the Toronto Grey ami Bruce Ktrilway < 'ompany, under the fol- 
lowing terms : 

1st — There shall be a Freight; and Passenger Station at or within one mile of 
Shelbourne, in the Township of Melancthon. 

2nd — A Flag Station at a convenient point near Dundalk Post Office 

3rd — A Flag Station at or near Lot 190, 1st Concession, Toronto and Sydenham 
lload. (S.W.) 

4th — A Freight and Passenger Station, at or near the Durham and Collingwood 
Road, at the most practicable point between Flesherton and Side Road No. '20, North 
Durham Road, in Artemesia. 

5th — A Freight and Passenger Station at or near Side Road No 100, south-west 
of Toronto and Sydenham lload, in the Township of Glenelg. 

Gth — A Flag Station at or near Side Road No. 60, Toronto and Sydenham lload, 
S. W., in the Township of Holland. 

7th — A Freight and Passenger Station at, or as near as practicable to the Village 
of Williamsford. 

8th — A Freight and Passenger 4 Station at, or within one mile of the Village of 
Chatsworth, and a Flag Station between Chatsworth and Owen Sound. 
i 9th — The Railway shall come to the w r ater of Owen Sound Bay, and that there be 
a Freight and Passenger Station in the Town of Owen Sound, within one and a 
quarter miles of the Town Hall, in Owen Sound. 

10th — That the construction of the Road he commenced at Owen Sound and 
Orangeville, and carried on simultaneously, and he completed within eighteen 
months -from the delivery of the Debentures to the Trustees, under the Act incor- 
porating the Toronto, Grey and Bruce Railway. 

11th — The said Bonus shalL be expended ( prorato) wholly in the County of Grey, 
between the Town of Owen Sound and the Town of Orangeville. 

12th — That before the delivery of the Debentures to the Trustees, the, said Com- 
pany shall give their Bond to the County of Grey, in the Penalty of Two Hundred 
and Sixty-four Thousand Dollars for the performance of the terms above mentioned. 

13th — That the said Company shall enter into an agreement with the said Cor- 
poration of the County of Grey to complete the said Railway, and have it running 
within eighteen months from the. delivery of the Debentures to the said Trustees, 
and to pay, by way of liquidated damages, the sum of Five Thousand Dollars per 
month for each and every month, after two years, that the said railway remains in- 
completed and not actually running, from the time of the delivery of the Debentures 
to the Trustees aforesaid. 

Owen Sound, 7th March, 1871. 
D. McGREGOR, Reeve of Holland ; R. J. DOYLE, Reeve of Sarawak ; 
WM. LECKIE, Reeve of Artemesia ; B. GHENT, Deputy Reeve of Abteme- 
sia ; ROBT. McGHEE, Reeve of Melancthon; JOHN CAMERON, Deputy 
Reeve of Holland ; Hugh Reed, Reeve of Sydenham ; THOS. PF/fTMAN, 
Reeve of Keppell ; JAS. BEATIE, Reeve of Sullivan ; D. McGILLlVRAY, 
Deputy Reeve of Sullivan ; ROBT. LYNN, Reeve of Derby ; J AS. GARD- 
NER, Deputy Reeve of Sydenham. 

I, John Gordon, President of the Toronto, Grey and Bruce Railway, hereby, 
on behalf of the said Company, agree to the said terms. 

JOHN GORDON, 

President Toronto, Grey and Bruce Railway Company. 



Progress made by the Toronto road. 

The Toronto, Grey & Bruce Railway Company will have built no less 
than 90 miles of Kail way in little over eighteen months, in proof of 
which read the following letter from Mr. E. Shanly, the contractor, who 
s doubtless well-known to the ratepayers of Grey. Have the Welling- 
ton, Grey & Bruce Railway Company paid their contractor yet for the 
work he has done, or did they blacken his eyes instead 1 Ask Mr. 
Reekie? Why is that gentleman not sent to Grey as he was to Bruce, 
when the Bruce By-Law was before the people % Why, because he has 
been swindled by the Hamilton Company, and has found out that they 
are a bogus concern % Ask where is Reekie : 

Toronto, 31st March, 1871. 

TO THE PRESIDENT AND DIRECTORS OF THE TORONTO, GREY AND 
BRUCE RAILWAY,— GENTLEMEN, -Having recently returned from an inspec- 
tion of the works being carried out under my contract between Weston and Arthnr- 
I am enabled to state, that notwithstanding the winter weather, which from the con, 
stant thaws has been peculiarly unfavorable to the excavations, as well as to the de- 
livery of material, everything necessary for an early completion of your line is in. 
as forward a state as can be expected or desired. 

The Grading up to Oraugeville is all completed, with the exception of about a \ 
mile, which is however in progress, and will not in any way obstruct the laying of 
the track which should reach there, say in two weeks from now. 

The material for the fencing, not erected last year, has all been delivered, and the 
building will be commenced immediately the frost leaves the ground. The station 
buildings are all up, and nearly completed between Weston and Oraugeville, includ- 
ing those of the latter point, and if the ballasting is proceeded with, immediately the 
weather permits, there will be nothing to prevent the line from being opened for 
frame by the beginning of July as far as Orangeville. 

From Orangeville to Arthur operations have not ceased during the winter, the 
extreme wetness of the summer and fall of last year, together with the scarcity and 
high price of labour, having materially retarded progress on this portion of the line, 
obliging me to continue work into, and during winter at a great disadvantage, in 
order to allow of the track being laid without interruption from Orangeville, when 
after reaching that point, and they having adopted this course, no delay is anticipa- 
ted, as the Bridge at Grand River, and the long and heavy embankments there and 
-at Boyne Creek will be completed in good time to allow of the work reaching Arthur 
by the first of August. 

On the Section from Arthur to Mount Forest — 15 miles — for which I closed a con- 
tract with you on 25th January, the works are progressing favourably, a large 
quantity of material for Fencing, Bridging, &c, and also Ties, have been delivered, 
and the whole of such material provided for. 

The grading has been commenced at all important points, and so soon as the 
ground is sufficiently dry a large force will be engaged on this work. The buildings 
are also so far arranged for that they will be commenced immediately, and I am in 
hopes by the 1st of August to be ready to lay track at Arthur, and to continue, 
without interruption, uiltil Mount Forest is reached ; the balasting will be proceeded 
with simultaneously, and if no unlooked for obstacle occurs, the line will be ready 
for traffic throughout by the first day of October next. 

The promise of an unusually early opening of the spring,, and the prospect of a 
moderately dry summer, gives me confidence that with an average supply of labour 
we will not be disappointed in our expectations. 

Yours truly, 

F. SHANLY. 



8 
The Bubble Burst, 

The great bugbear the enemies of the Narrow Guage have tried to' 



•-> 



frighten the people with, is that these roads would prove a failure in our 
climate. It was nothing to them that these roads have worked well in 
Norway, with a climate as rigorous and snows as deep as ours — they 
still stuck to it that they had not been tried in Canada and would prove 
a failure here. This last support is now knocked from under them by 
the letter of Mr. Wragge, Chief- Engineer of the Toronto, Grey & Bruce 
Railway, a gentleman of large experience in the building of all kinds of 
Railways. 

Narrow Gauge Hallways. 

To the Editor of jthe Times, — Sir, I understand that in the contest now taking 
place in the County of Grey, between the Toronto, Grey and Bruce and the Welling- 
ton, Grey and Bruce Railways, both of whom are seeking for bonuses in aid of their 
construction, the old cry against the efficiency of Narrow Gauge Railways is being 
brought up again. 

I have not up to the present time taken any active part in the discussion of Broad 
vs. Narrow Gauge Railways, but when I find Statements made which are wholly at 
variance with the facts, I feel bound to come forward in the interests of those Rail- 
way Companies who have entrusted me with the charge of their works, and to pre- 
vent the ratepayers of the County of Grey from being led away by statements from 
unscrupulous persons whose only object is to mislead. 

With your permission, therefore, I will as briefly as possible give a few facts 
connected with Railways of 3 feet 6 inches gauge, to show their capabilities of 
carrying all the traffic which is likely to come upon a Railway through your section 
of the country. In doing this, let it be understood that I mention nothing which 
has not come either within my own personal experience or that of the authorities I 
name in each case. 

There are four points upon which T will touch, being those most often controverted 
— namely : Speed, Safety, Snow, and capacity for carrying freight and Passenger 
traffic. 

1st. Sjyccd. — I have traveled both here and in Norway on Narrow Gauge Railways, 
at a speed of 35 miles an hour vith perfect safety. The manager of the Queensland 
Railways wiites as follows : "I have run trains at speeds of 30 miles an hour, and 
found them smoother than on an ordinary English Railway at similar speed ; our 
ordinary trains run at a speed of 20 miles an hour, including stoppages." The 
working expenses depend in a great measure to the speed at which the trains are run, 
In Norway, Railways of 4 feet 8 h inches, and of 3 feet 6 inches gauge, made by the 
same Engineer and worked by the same manager, all run at similar speeds, and the 
Narrow Gauge Railways cost less to work than the broad gauge. 

2nd, Safety — The floor of our Passenger Cars is at a level of 2 feet 7 inches above 
the level of the rails, and they are 8 feet 6 inches in width. The broad gauge cars 
are 4 feet 6 inches above the rails, and thej r are 11 feet G inches in width. It does not 
need a philosopher to see that of the two the narrow gauge cars are the safest, as the 
width of the car compared with the height of the centre of gravity renders them less 
liable to oscillation. Mr. Pihl, the Norwegian Government Engineer, writes as fol- 
lows : " As to the safety of fast running, engines and carriages run as safely and stead- 
ily at 30 miles an hour on the 3 feet 6 inches gauge as they do on one of 4 feet 8. 1 , 
inches. I have run at upwards of 40 miles an hour Avith as much feeling of ease and 
security as I have felt while running on a broader gauge. " The Manager of the 
Queensland Narrow Gauge Railway says : " We have never had a train off the line, 
no enginehas ever been damaged seriously, and no train has ever been delayed more 
than 30 minutes since the^ opening of the line three years si wee." A pretty good 
record. 



9 

3rd. Snows — Major Adelskold, Government Railway Engineer in Sweden, says, 
•' Experience during several severe winters here has shown that our lines Iiave been 
kept as free from snow as the broader ones. The narrow gauge may thus be said to 
have given satisfactory results in Sweden. " Mr. Pihl says that in Norway. " out- 
snow ploughs make no difficulty at three feet of snow or more." I have run our 
engines through cuttings with two feet of snow or more in them, on the Toronto, 
Grey and Bruce Railway with only the cowcatcher .in front of them, as we had no 
snow plough at all at work during last winter. So much for the bugbear. 

4th. Capacity — Our own gravel trains carried a load of 100 ton?-, paying load, as a 
regular thing when atjwork last fall, and if only ten of such trains ran daily, there would 
be a capacity of over 300,000 tons of freight carried in a year, a traffic far in excess of 
what may be expected for many years, I am afraid. I need go no further than this 
for facts. As for passenger trains, Mr. Scott, the Secretary of the Madras 3 feet G 
inches guage railway says : "We have carried upwards of 20,000 passengers over 
our Eailway of 20 miles in length on one of the festival days." Why the Northern 
Eailway has never carried more than'150, 000 in a year, and the Thorondjen Eail- 
way in Norway carries annually 2,100' passengers per mile of Railway, half as many 
again as the Northern. I get this fact from the Norwegian government returns. 

I am glad to say, Mr. Editor, that that terrible difficulty, the Caledon mountain, 
has vanished into the air. We should never be able to get an engine np it and all 
such balderdash was the song six months ago, our engines are now working at Charles- 
ton, 3 miles beyond the top of the mountain, and will be at Orangeville before the 
18th of April, but I suppose our Hamilton friends won't believe even this fact. I 
am sir, your obedient servant, 

Edmund Wilagoe, 
Chief-Engineer, T., G. & B. E. 
Toronto, March 28th 1871. 



A Falsehood Nailed. 

The Hamilton Company would have the people of Grey believe 
that the Narrow Gauge is a failure. Read what Messrs. Gooderliam & 
"Worts, one of the largest milling firms in Ontario; John Abell, the 
well-known manufacturer of farming implements, and Hoe & Brother, 
the enterprising storekeepers of Woodbridge, have to say on the subject. 
These firms all live in the country, and on the line of the Toronto, Grey 
and Bruce Bail way, and daily see the engines at work. They know all 
about the working of the line ; and, unsolicited, give their testimony 
about it. Bead their letter, farmers of Grey, and when Hamilton false- 
hoods about the inefficiency of the Narrow Gauge are endeavored to be 
foisted upon you, nail them with it. , 

Woodbridge, April 4, 1871. 
To the Directors of the Toronto, Grey and Brucn Eailway : — 

Gentlemen, — We learn that some people, in the interest of Hamilton, rre 
endeavoring to throw doubt upon the working capacity of the Toronto, Grey and 
Bruce Eailway. During the months of December, January and February last, your 
road carried for us 200 car-loads of freight between AVeston and Woodbridge, all of 
which Avas done with regularity and despatch. 

We had many opportunities during the winter of witnessing the working of the 
Eailway, and we have no hesitation in expressing our conviction that it can be 
operated readily, and experiences no more difficulty from snow-storms than a broad 
gauge railway does, 

ALFEED GOODEEHAM, (for Gooderliam & Worts), 

Pine Grove Mills. 

JOHN ABELL, Woodbridge. 

ROE & BROTHER, Woodbridge. 



10 
Toronto v. Hamilton or Wall Street to a China Orange. 

* Hear what the great Adam Hope, leading merchant of Hamilton 
says of that city, as compared with Toronto. The following are his 
words, as printed in the Hamilton Spectator of 24th February, 1871. 

The city of Toronto has long enjoyed the priceless advantages of two rival and 
competing linos of railway, and hence her rapid growth in manufactures, population, 
and commercial activity. Hamilton, on the other hand, with but one railway, is 
little better than a mere way station, and hence the slow growth of our city in all 
that characterizes the rapid progress of the neighbouring city. Toronto commands 

through rates irom England by Portland and the Grand Trunk Railway, or by 
aew lork and the Great Western. Hamilton again is entirely at the mercy of the 

courtesy o the Great Western Railway. We do not require to go far to seek a 
i 3m 5 *i unsatisfactory state of things, but if allowed to slip out of our 

hands the opportunity may never again be oiys, and therefore, we would earnestly 
recommend a direct connection with the Grand Trunk Railway. It has become a 
necessity for Hamilton, if she is not to sink into a second-rate town, to see that she 
is brought into direct connection with the Grand Trunk system, the great national 
railway of the Dominion, at the earliest possible moment, and that, too, 
irrespective of what the Great Western Railway may think, say or do in the premises. 
An accomodation train leaving Goderich every morning at an early hour for Hamil- 
ton, and returning the same evening, would do more for tht trade o/ Hamilton than 
even the \\ ellmgten, Grey and Bruce Railway. Hamilton has been gradually losing 
her trade on the Buffalo and Lake Huron Railway from the difficulties connected 
with the transfer of traffic at Paris. We are also threatened with a withdrawal of 
the co-operation of the Great Western Railway in the Wellington, Grey and Bruce 
Railway scheme. The share property of the Great Western Railway (if really liable 
under an act of the Local Legislature) has been loaded down with a million sterling 
in the foolish outlay on the Glencoe Loop-line, the interest on which would have 
swept away more than the last half yearly surplus for dividend, but for the increase 
in the local traffic. 

Hear also how the Owen Sound Advertiser shows up the absurdity 
of comparing Yankee Hamilton with Toronto, the Queen City of Wes- 
tern Canada : 

" A few figures will best illustrate the choice of market question : — From Owen 
Sound to Hamilton via Clifford, 148 miles. From Owen Sound to Toronto via 
Orangeville, 118 miles, showing a distance of 30 miles in favor of Toronto market ; 
from Owen Sound to Suspension Bridge via Orangeville and Toronto, 199 miles; from 
Owen Sound to Suspension Bridge via Clifford, 191 miles, a distance of eight miies 
against the Orangeville route. Certainly a small thing to boast much of and a slender 
base for the exclusive privilege of doing the carrying trade to the American market. 
Eight miles is but a small difference of distance considering the total length of the 
road, and on account of the more economical character of the Orangeville road, it 
will be able to compete successfully with the Clifford road. Hence we find the 
choice of market really lies with the Toronto, Grey and Bruce Railway. For surely 
this eight miles is more than compensated, apart from the question of competition, 
by the advantage of having the Toronto market open at 118 miles, especially when 

is taken into account that the great bulk of the business connections of this county 
already formed with Toronto, and that most cf our produce finds its way to the 

■ Tantic sea-board, whence also our importations of goods are received. The great 
A ortance of a direct route will be seen here at a glance. The Toronto, 
Grey and Bruce railway running straight towards the great St. Lawrence 
highway of trade, recommends itself as paramount to all others. 
Certainly, the W. G. & B. road, by way of Clifford, will not bear -comparison 
with it. And besides, the latter would shut us out of the Toronto market altogether, 
as no one would think of going to Toronto via Hamilton. So far then as the choice 
of Markets is .concerned, and indeed in almost every other respect, the Toronto, 



11 

Grey and Bruce Central line is immeasurably to be preferred to the round-about W. 
G. and B. Route. This Company undertake to build the road in eighteen months, 
and incur heavy damages if the road is not completed at the end of two years. 
Among other things they also bind themselves to commence at both ends of the road 
simultaneously. Such is the bond they will give. But these guarantees the other 
Company refuse to give. The Toronto, Grey and Bruce in this also recommends 
itself to us. It is, in fact, just the road we want. Here then, is our opportunity ; 
let us not miss it. " 



A Comparison. 

Read the following table of distances between Owen Sound and Lake 
Ontario, as per Toronto, Grey & Bruce Railway and Wellington, Grey 
<fc Bruce Railway, and listen to what Mr. W. K. Muir, the General Su- 
perintendent and Manager of the Great Western Railway, lias to say on 
the subject, as per his letter in the Toronto Globe of 30th Jan., 1871. 
He intends, as you will see, to carry all your freight from Owen Sound 
to Toronto over 70 miles more road than via the Toronto, Grey & Bruce 
Railway, and he will make the people of Grey pay sweetly for doing so 
if he gets the chance. Don't let him have it, men of Grey. His prom- 
ises to the contrary are no guarantees. 



12 



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13 

Extract from Mr. Muiris letter to the Globe : — 

" ISTo one would suppose that the people of Hamilton and the W. G. k B. Cora- 
■" pany took such energetic action in building and extending this road for the Grand 
" Trunk Company's cars to take the freight from it, and away from the Grtat 
" Western. The bondholders, I presume, have something to say about that ; and, 
" I think, so long as the freight from the north is taken in GREAT WESTERN 
" CARS to TORONTO, and to and- for all other points to which it is consigned, at 
" rates never iiighee than those charged by the Grand Trunk and with quite as 
" much despatch, we believe shippers of freight and the promoters and bondholders 
" of the road will have no cause to complain." 

Would not a branch of a railway bonded for $12,000 per mile, 

ike the Wellington, Grey and Bruce Railway, be really more of a curse 

than a benefit to the County of Grey — and is this not the reason why 

the Great Western Railway are already threatening to withdraw their 

-co-operation, as Mr. Adam Hope says they are. 



Cordwood. 

Do the farmers of Grey wish to continue in the tuture as they have 
•done in the past, burning their valuable cordwood at a cost of $14 per 
acre, when by voting for the Toronto, Grey and Bruce By-Law they can 
turn it into money, and earn by the sale uf it three times as much as 
will pay the entire railway tax of the county % Surely not. The 
Toronto, Grey and Bruce Railway Company is bound by the terms of 
its Charter to carry cordwood at 2£c. per cord per mile for distances of 
over 50 miles, and 3c. per cord per mile for less distances. Wood, in 
Toronto, is now selling at $8 per cord, whereas in Hamilton it is only $4. 
What says the Wellington, Grey <fc Bruce Railway Company to this? Let 
them show the people of Grey in their charter a clause binding them to 
carry cordwood if they can. They intend in this matter to follow the 
selfish example of Mr. Cumberland, and the Northern Railway, and by 
refusing to carry wood, will keep the price down to $1.50 per cord, so 
that their engines can be cheaply run. Farmers of Grey look out foj 
this huge swindle on the part of the Hamilton Company, and by voting 
for the Toronto, Grey & Bruce By-Law, show that you appreciate the 
efforts made by the Toronto Company, (guarranteed to you by their 
charter) to turn your cordwood into money. 



The Question at Issue. 

Farmers of Grey you have now the case before you. On one side 
you have an independent line to the capital of Ontario, the best market 
in the Dominion ; a line backed by the best men in the Province, and 
bound to carry out their promises. As an evidence of their good faith 



14 

and ability, their names are before you. They promise to commence 
boldly from both ends of the line and work until finished, with a'bonded 
debt only of $G,000 per mile. On the other hand you are offered a 
Branch from Clifford, running for 40 miles parallel, within 14 or 16 miles- 
of the Bruce Branch to Southampton, as crooked as a ram's horn, bonded 
for the enormous sum of $12,000 per mHe j and, if ever built to North 
Grey (of which there is not the least chance), the monopoly would be a 
curse instead of a blessing to the county. Your farms would be for 
ever taxed to pay the bloated English bondholders. But what chance 
has North Grey of ever getting the Wellington, Grey and Bruce Road, 
even if the people voted for it? There might be a chance for Normanby, 
but certainly none for North Grey. Next, if built, would the Great 
Western Railway work it ! Never ! Rest assured of this ! Your 
road and money. would share the fate of the Preston and Berlin 
Road which was built ; but the Great Western Railway 
finding it a non-paying concern, sold the rails to the Grand 
Trunk, and the line remains a standing monument until this 
day, of Great Western Railway broken faith. Again take the 
Hamilton and Port Dover road, which was graded, and ties and rails 
laid upon it, yet it was never finished. The ties were allowed to rot, 
and the rails sold to the Northern Railroad Co. Take now an example 
nearer home. You know what was done by this Hamilton Company 
with the County of Bruce, and how the people of that section have 
been treated. It is now over two years since the Bruce Bonus was 
voted, and not a sod has yet been turned in that county, nor is it likely 
one ever will be. More atrocious still : last session of Parliament the 
Wellington, Grey & Bruce Co. got an act of Parliament passed, giving 
them another year to get to Bruce, and this without the consent of the 
people. Will you support a bottomless Company like this 1 Let it be 
hoped, never ! You are independent men, and will support an inde- 
pendent railway like the Toronto, Grey & Bruce. 



Come out, farmers of Grey, in your might on the 18th 
of April, and vote early in support of your best interests* 
and the Toronto By-Law. 



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